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Cat skin diseases

Cat skin diseases

Cat skin diseases, exist and are rather annoying, although these animals are quite devoted to cleaning their coat. If we often see them licking and smoothing their fur, we don't think they do it unnecessarily, but we don't ignore the fact that they are there. Cat skin diseases and that, as masters, we must intervene to treat them properly. For the ones we will explain, a lick is not enough.

Cat skin diseases: feline acne

Between Cat skin diseases more annoying, there is feline acne that occurs around the lips and on the chin. This variation of the hair and skin is most often linked to an incorrect diet that causes poor digestion.

Not only that, the problems of a inadequate way of eating they also concern constipation. And then thefeline acne, recognizable by the presence of black points both on the chin and on the lips, and a swelling of the chin. It can also happen that pustules appear and the cat feels itchy in the affected area.

If we manage to notice and intervene early, then we can take care of the cat ourselves washing the diseased parts with mild soap and hot water, drying them well so that the infection does not spread. However, it is necessary to contact the veterinarian if we see that the situation is more serious or if there is no improvement despite our intervention.

Cat skin diseases: dermatitis

There are several types of dermatitis, are in general Cat skin diseases linked to inflammation but it is the origin of the same that can change. Flea bites are the most frequent reason for this problem but we do not take it for granted: among the causes of a dermatitis we also find infections, food allergy, shampoos not suitable for the feline coat.

Our cat can have dermatitis if he constantly scratches and shows scabs and redness, swelling and breakage of hair. Similar symptoms are those of miliary dermatosis, caused by allergies to flea saliva, food allergies, or house dust allergies.

To cure these Cat skin diseases pesticides are used to be applied to both the animal and the objects it often uses and the places it frequents: sofas, armchairs, pillows. In cases of infections, however, it is necessary to ask the vet about antibiotics.

Cat skin diseases: alopecia

A cat that shows patches of hairless coat is not a hairless cat but has contractedalopecia. It must be treated with the help of the veterinarian, we can distinguish it from a temporary loss of hair due to wounds or scars, because in the affected area the hair does not grow back.

Cat skin diseases: eczema

Felines, like humans, can also suffer from skin diseases such as eczema, an irritation that causes redness, scabs, blisters. Among the causes there are both allergies and incorrect dietary regimes, or simply a sudden and inappropriate "baby food change".

To understand better, it is necessary go to the vet as soon as we see that our animal scratches the scabs and sheds the hair in patches. Another one has similar symptoms cat skin disease, mange. It comes from mites and can also be transmitted to us and other animals but it is treatable and can also be prevented.

Cat skin diseases: fungi

Fungi can also cause Cat skin diseases, skin fungi, of course, and there are numerous of them. One of them causes the fabulous ringworm, annoying, which causes redness and scabs similar to honeycombs in hives, reaches the cat from mice and is very contagious, it can only be cured by isolating the animal and giving it ointments and antibiotics.

Then there is the ringworm, fungal infection that creates areas devoid of hair and debris greyish scales, can be transmitted to humans. Among the cat skin diseases linked to fungi we do not forget the Mycosis.

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Video: How to Treat Generalized Skin Infections on Cats (October 2021).